Lucky 13: Q & A with a first-time drag king

It’s been three years since the first official University of Alberta Pride Week was celebrated on campus. In human years, it’s still a toddler. But the Annual OUTreach Drag Show, which will kick off UAlberta Pride Week 2016 this Saturday, has been around for 13 years. Consider it the spirited older sister that paved the way for its younger sibling.

Read More…

Looking at the classroom as a microcosm of the world

Amidst the devastation and chaos of the Syrian conflict, the successful relocation and settlement of refugees in Canada and other receiving nations offers a glimmer of hope in a seemingly dire, intractable situation.

But these newcomers still face many challenges in integrating with and accessing the benefits of the societies they’re joining. One such challenge is obtaining an education, especially given their unique needs beyond cultural differences, language deficits and the customary challenges faced by other migrants.

Read More…

“Education is way different than school”

Sean Lessard refers to his return to Edmonton as a kind of homecoming, even though he hails from the Montreal Lake Cree Nation in Saskatchewan. Maybe it’s because Lessard, who joined the University of Alberta Faculty of Education’s Department of Secondary Education this January, has a knack for creating a sense of community wherever he pursues his research and pedagogy involving Indigenous youth.

Read More…

Social justice by the book

Literature presents a way for the reader to see the world from unique perspectives, but can it help create a fairer, more just society?

Ingrid Johnston, professor emerita in the University of Alberta’s Department of Secondary Education, is researching how texts taught in school can open students’ eyes to racial, cultural and other kinds of difference, as well as to social issues such as poverty and addiction, as a way of cultivating empathy and global citizenship.

Read More…

Ninth Floor revisits most explosive student uprising in Canadian history

More than four decades ago, one of the most contested episodes in Canada’s history began at Sir George Williams University in Montreal.

It started quietly, when a group of Caribbean students at the school (now a part of Concordia University) began to suspect one of their professors of discrimination because of unfair grading. The suspicions then became formal accusations of racism, which were mishandled by university administration, and students occupied the university computer lab on the ninth floor of the Henry F. Hall Building in protest.

Read More…

Youth X-Change links communities for learning partnership

Separated by thousands of kilometres, three Indigenous community schools in western and northern Canada are taking part in an innovative partnership with University of Alberta researchers and supporting organizations to find new ways to engage Aboriginal students that better serve their diverse educational needs.

Read More…

From surviving to thriving

As recently as a decade ago, research into resilience in sexual and gender minority youth tended to focus primarily on the adversity and trauma they endure. André P.

Read More…

Pages