These unexpected journeys

By Vivian Lee

Some of us feel as if we were born to teach. It is the same as how some of us feel we were born to be writers, dancers or gourmet chefs. But, for the rest of us, for most of us, what happens is a little more of a stumbling about. We walk on, hoping it is forward. And, perhaps, one day, we realize that our feet – without any explicit instructions – have taken us through forests and plains, skirting oceans and low-lying hills, to stand in front of a classroom.

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Life, leukocytes, and the pursuit of happiness: Dr. Sarah Forgie and the MEd in HSE Program

By Vivian Lee

rom small-town northern Manitoba (population four hundred, accessible via gravel road) to a metropolis of a million, the road to health(care) has been paved with bug infections. Dr. Sarah Forgie, a pediatric infectious disease physician at the Stollery Children’s Hospital who hails from Lynn Lake, has been widely recognized for her research on the mischievous microbes that make us sick. However, what has made her stand-out on a national level are her unconventional teaching methods.

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8 tips for developing a better teacher voice

There is no way around it, teachers need to be able to project their voices and command attention with them. The students sitting at the back of the classroom need to be able to clearly understand what you are saying.

Learning how to properly project your voice without yelling is a skill all teachers need to learn.  If you put too much strain on your vocal cords you will be hoarse by the end of the second week on the job.

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Hope Studies Central Opens

Nobody is going to save me. I am going to die without my pain ever truly being understood by anybody. There is no way out. No one cares. Life is hard and it just gets harder. There is no future for me. I am not important anyway.

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A Bridge Without Limits: Aaron Dublenko and Student-Led Initiatives for Sustainable Education (SLISE)

By Vivian Lee

It was the year 1998, after the break-up of the Soviet Union, when Aaron Dublenko found himself in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk. A factory town that skirted the Yenisei River, it had just begun to open itself up to foreigners. Dublenko, then newly graduated from the UAlberta’s forensic anthropology program, was helping to repatriate an old Russian burial ground. It was dust and bone work.

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Grad student turns heads in Norwegian schools with technology-charged pedagogy

It was March 2012 when a consortium of schools in Norway asked the Director of the Centre for Math, Science and Technology Education (CMASTE), Dr. Bob Ritter, who UAlberta could send over to demo innovative ways teachers could harness the power of new classroom technologies. He knew of the perfect person – Kandise Salerno.

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No tolerance for no zeros

By Harrison M. Campbell, current student

If there is any one issue that has captured the spotlight in the educational world of Alberta in recent months it is the no zero policy. Twisted and amplified through the media, the policy took centre stage in an intense debate between school boards, parents, and students. The media made the policy appear as if Edmonton Public was disadvantaging their students by not preparing them for the demands of the real world. How will they survive the workforce or university if they never do their work?

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